The Austral Islands

The Austral Islands lie 450 miles south-southwest of Tahiti.  There are five main islands in the archipelago of which only the two principal islands of Rurutu and Tubuai currently have regular air service.  The islands are high islands with large flat coastal plain areas.  Of the two, Rurutu is more rugged.  They are part of the same submerged ocean mountain range that includes the Cook Islands, which lie 600 miles to  the northwest.

 

The islands were first discovered by Captain Cook, who discovered Rurutu in 1769 and Tubuai in 1777.  The rest of the islands were discovered by a number of European explorers over the following forty four years, with the last Rimatara being discovered in 1821.

 

Despite there being very few beaches, the islands are ideal for clients looking for a very quiet location to retreat, read and relax.  There are currently no quality hotels although good accommodation is provided in a range of pensions.

 

A visit to the Australes is not for travellers looking for a sun and sand experience, but if you want a truly relaxing, cultural experience then a trip to these islands will be well worth the time.  Also, if you visit the island of Rurutu between the months of July and October you will have the added experience of seeing Humpback Whales, who migrate from their Antarctic feeding grounds to the waters around the island to breed and mate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




An introduction to the different islands
Rurutu

Rurutu

A visit to Rurutu is not for travellers looking for a sun and sand experience, but if you want a truly relaxing and cultural experience then Rurutu will be well worth a visit.

View Now

Tubuai

Tubuai

A visit to Tubuai is not for travellers looking for a sun and sand experience, but if you want a truly relaxing and cultural experience then a trip to these islands will be well worth the time.

View Now

 
Transpacific International Standards Logo's

Copyright Transpacific Holidays 2009. Greenmeads House, Dayseys Hill, Outwood, Surrey. RH1 5QY